Therapeutic Care Blog

The CETC blog tells the stories behind 'what works' in Intensive Therapeutic Care

April 29, 2021 |

Review of New Briefing Papers on Child Sexual Exploitation

Much of the available research regarding the sexual exploitation of children and young people is explored through the prism of victim as female and perpetrator as male. As a result, considerable knowledge gaps persist in respect to the interplay between victim gender and their individual characteristics, the abuse process and official responses to them. It …

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April 27, 2021 |

New, free training: Responding to Child Sexual Exploitation

Last week, we launched our new Responding to Child Sexual Exploitation online training resource for caseworkers, residential workers, house supervisors and managers, therapeutic specialists and organisational leaders working in out of home care and therapeutic care. The Centre for Excellence in Therapeutic Care was commissioned by the New South Wales Department of Communities and Justice to develop a training …

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March 9, 2021 |

A Story You May Recognise

Peta had worked in residential care for 18 months. She took the position because she had had a difficult childhood and she felt that she had a lot to offer the young people in care. She was currently undertaking Cert IV and she was really enjoying it. There was a new young woman in the …

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February 9, 2021 |

Achieving Effective Supervision – Games That Supervisors Play

In the previous blog, we discussed how easy it is for the supervisor/supervisee relationship to be consciously or sub-consciously ambushed by power/defensive game play. Kadushin (1968) described games as repetitive patterns arising between supervisor and supervisee, where one or both players consciously or subconsciously adopt a strategy to maximise safety and minimise potential threat. Even …

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February 3, 2021 |

Neuroscience Meets Leadership

In this blog, I explore the relationship between neuroscience and leadership. The latest research in neuroscience tells us that our neurobiology is what drives our behaviour and defines how we, as leaders, make meaning, solve problems, and carry out tasks with others. First, a quick refresher on two critical areas of the brain that affect …

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December 10, 2020 |

Understanding vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue

Research shows how profoundly influenced we are by other people’s emotional states and how rapidly our interpersonal affective responses occur, and how dynamically our physiology responds to others’ emotional states. This is why trauma can be emotionally contagious. I have experienced it personally. When I was working doing assessments of very violent and sexually abusive …

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November 19, 2020 |

‘Tis the Season to be Jolly’ – but not for everyone

It’s all too easy to get wrapped up in the fun and happiness of Christmas and forget that, for others, the season isn’t necessarily a joyful one. For some the young people in the ITC system, Christmas has not been a happy time and can bring back difficult memories. Arguments, violence or aggression in the …

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October 2, 2020 |

The Healing Power of Friendship

“A friend is someone who helps you up when you’re down, and if they can’t, they lay down beside you and listen.” Winnie the Pooh Can the friendships and connections that can develop in Intensive Residential Care be nurtured and grown rather than feared? I would like you to take a moment to think back …

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August 11, 2020 |

The role of praise in working with young people

Traumatised children tend to receive little praise, and therefore, don’t respond well to praise. We can see each of our daily interactions with each of the young people we care for as bids for connection.  By choosing to turn toward, to turn away, or turn against each other’s bid for connection and opportunity for change. …

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July 15, 2020 |

Understanding and Supporting Young People Who Self-Harm in Residential Care

Some of the young people we care for in the ITC programs deal with emotional distress and pain by hurting themselves physically. Young people hurting themselves is distressing to them and to those who care for them. ITC staff may experience a range of emotions, including anger, sadness, helplessness, guilt, shame or disgust. In response …

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